Category Archives: Gifted

Summer Reading 2014

I’ve seen several new Summer Reading lists for children in the last few days — some have various prizes for accomplishing them, for others the prize is just getting introduced to some great books.

Thought I’d share:

Reward based mega-list: http://www.capitallyfrugaldc.com/2014/05/29/business-sponsored-summer-reading-programs-2014/ 

American Library Association picks:
http://www.ala.org/alsc/2014-summer-reading-list

Scholastic Challenge:
http://www.scholastic.com/ups/campaigns/src-2014

From SummerReading.org:
http://www.summerreading.org/booklists.php

From a reliable teacher-website:
http://www.education.com/seasonal/summer-reading/

Annual Reading Rockets List:
http://www.readingrockets.org/books/summer

and of course, my favorite:

Classic Children’s Books (20 years or older, but still readily available):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_children's_classic_books

Happy Summer Reading! 🙂

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Summer Reading 2013

I am very pleased to announce that one of my favorite Oldies But Goodies has been selected by my local school system for their 9th grade gifted summer reading program: A Walk Across America, by Peter Jenkins

(along with Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers – not an Oldie But Goodie, but a fine read nonetheless). Great choice, Local School System!

Students (and adults) of both sexes will enjoy this book, a first-hand account of Peter Jenkins’ 1970’s true life adventure, in which he finds his dog, his bride and ultimately himself.

Additionally, a sister Oldies But Goodies novel is making news this season with its re-release from Ballantine Books. Formerly very difficult to find (believe me, I’ve tried and there’s NOTHING out there for under $75.00…) The Girl of the Sea of Cortez

by Peter Benchley is available for pre-order with a shipping date of August 20, 2013. Although Benchley is best known for Jaws, The Girl of the Sea of Cortez is (in my opinion) his masterwork. A beautifully visual read, it is the story of Paloma, a girl who lives near the Sea of Cortez in Mexico (a.k.a. The Gulf of California, located between the Baja Peninsula and the mainland. For more on this area of the world, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_of_California ).

Her love of the sea and the creatures in it is threatened by greedy outsiders without a care for the destruction they will leave behind. Not only is it a great book, it makes my environmentalist heart go pitter-pat.

Both Walk Across America and The Girl of the Sea of Cortez (and Outliers and Jaws, too, for that matter) are great books for a summer read at the beach, the pool, or curled up in bed with the air-conditioner blasting on you. Even if you don’t have plans to travel this summer, after you’ve read them, you will feel well-rested and dream of faraway places.

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2012 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 2,300 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 4 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.

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I Already Read That

Many, many times when I have suggested titles for students in their later years (by which I mean high school), I have gotten the, “Oh, I read that in fifth grade,” comment. It is frequently accompanied by the vaguely superior attitude that tends to distinguish a precocious reader.

In response, I have this to say: Reading something as a child is not the same as reading it in high school (or later). Yes, the words are the same, the characters are the same, and the plot is the same, but you, dear reader, are not.

The Chronicles of Narnia series, by C.S. Lewis, is a classic example of this. Easily digested as a fairy tale in one’s early years, in the hands of a teenager, it can boggle the mind with its innuendo and double meaning. So can The Hobbit. And Watership Down. And practically every other book not exclusively intended for the younger crowd.

Even when perfectly capable of understanding the words and following a complex plot, the preadolescent reader (even a gifted one) just doesn’t have the maturity to recognize the nuance and subtlety embedded in most literature.

Think I’m wrong? Dust one off and read it again.

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Best of the Blog V: Post Face Off

Product Details

For this last installment of The Best of the Blog (next week I will start writing new posts again), I was torn between one that had a large number of visitors the first time around, and one that I wrote when the blog was young and not many people saw it. Then I thought, “Why not both?”

• It Was the Worst of Times

• Scrabbling for Success: 10 Helpful Hints for the Querying Process

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Best of the Blog II: Considering Asynchronous Development in Book Selection

Here’s another installment of Best of the Blog. I’ll be back on June sixth with something new. See you then…

Considering Asynchronous Development in Book Selection

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Age Appropriate

Author friend and library denizen Ty Roth (So Shelly, February 2011) and I have exchanged several blog comments back and forth about censorship vs. rating books. Yesterday, he posted a wonderful summary of the issue on his blog, and I can’t say it any better than he did. Go take a look. 🙂

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